Training

My Life as a Gruntled Employee

Written by Elizabeth Smith Miller, Director of Marketing and Events, National Safe Place Network

I’m gruntled. I’m so gruntled I sneak around on the weekends, wake up really early, and stay at the “office” really late. I know, I know—you’re probably thinking this sounds like the beginning of a twisted Lifetime movie. I get that these activities can be seen in a negative light, but in this case—I assure you, they’re great!

“Gruntled” isn’t a term most people use to identify a “happy employee,” but I say, “why not?” It’s common to call an unhappy worker a “disgruntled employee.” Anyhow, I’m embracing the phrase. I’m gruntled. I mentioned before that I “sneak around on the weekends”—I like to work on weekends and “sneak” to work when my family members and friends are busy with things they like (my husband likes naps). I “wake up really early”—I open my eyes and my brain starts to think about what new projects we can start, how we can make more meaningful connections with the members and agencies that we care deeply for, and what new information is needed in the field. I have even been known to send emails with ideas before I get out of bed and head for a delicious cup of coffee. Before coffee . . . yes, I know—that’s pretty risky. I also “stay at the office really late”—I cannot “shut it down” at 5 p.m. I have tried (only because I was told about self-care—apparently that’s a thing), but I actually don’t think my mind ever stops. I love what I do so much, that I want to do it—all of the time. You’ve heard the phrase, “you’ll never work a day in your life if you do what you love to do.” Well, that’s it—I am just doing what I love to do and I believe that IS my self-care. I’m gruntled doing it.

Here are some of the things that make me gruntled. Perhaps some of these things will help you fill your organization with gruntled staff—or understand why they are gruntled and help you keep it that way:

  • I care about our mission and vision. I think in order to be truly gruntled at the workplace, one needs to be passionate about the mission and vision of the organization. For the record, the mission of NSPN is to ensure an effective system of response for youth in crisis through public and private partnerships at a local, state, and national level. The vision of NSPN is to create a world where all youth are safe. Who wouldn’t want to do that?
  • My supervisor is a leader. She leads by example. She believes in me. She checks her ego at the door and leaves that door open for input, ideas, and thoughts from all of her staff. She cares about my wants and needs to move forward. She listens—she takes the time to understand what MY idea of success is—and she helps provide the resources to accomplish it.
  • I’m challenged. There’s nothing like a good ol’ challenge to make me use my brain. Tasks can be difficult, but they are always possible. I care about our organization, partners, NSPN members, licensed Safe Place® agencies, and RHY grantees, so when I’m challenged, I know I’m playing a role in the success of all of these. (Being challenged also makes me gruntled, because it tells me I’m trusted.)
  • I have autonomy. I know some employees need a little more hand-holding than others, but I don’t believe any employee likes to be micro-managed. I cannot stand it. I’m happy I have the autonomy to do what I’m paid to do and do it well. You might have heard the phrase, “hire someone who is an expert and then get out of their way.” Well, it’s true. If you’re a micro-manager, stop now. You hired your employees for a reason—get out of their way and let them do it.
  • I’m comforted by transparency. I love that our organization is transparent. Gruntled employees remain content and safe when they know the direction of their organization. This doesn’t mean everyone is involved with every decision, but it does mean we support each other by providing the information and tools we need to carry out our responsibilities. Nothing demoralizes employees more than the phrase “need to know.” Everyone who knows me can tell you I don’t like this phrase. I think people who push “need to know” as a control mechanism, as an explanation or excuse for excluding staff who may think differently or excluding staff who question the status quo—have challenges they or their therapist “need to know.” One of the issues with “need to know” is no one seems to know who all “needs to know.” It’s based on perspective. Only including your “close friends” in a discussion or “accidentally” leaving someone out of a conversation disrupts the flow of the process.  Processes are in place for a reason. To help with this, determine teams (everyone who actually needs to know) and create contact lists (for use across the board), so when you email someone, you email the contact list and you don’t leave anyone out of the conversation.
  • I enjoy our culture. The team establishes the culture. Does it feel good when you walk into the office? Is it supportive and respectful or do you experience tension and stress? Being able to walk into an environment that is supportive enhances productivity—and gruntledness (not to mention it is definitely possible to have fun in the workplace).
  • I feel appreciated. Organizational leaders can’t always give their staff members a raise, but they can invest in them in other ways—including professional development. Don’t be afraid of developing your staff because they will move on—develop your staff so they can move up! They’ve already chosen your organization—show them you chose them as well. (By the way – NSPN offers a terrific Professional Development package with benefits like professional coaching for middle managers, an Emerging Leader Institute, Training of Trainer sessions, CEUs, Certified Youth Care course and certification, and more.  Invest in your employees by letting NSPN help. Take advantage of these benefits and let them grow professionally! Contact us at info@nspnetwork.org to learn more.)

They say happiness is contagious. I hope I’ve been able to share some ways you or your team can be happy—I mean . . . gruntled!

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NSPN: Meeting Your Personal, Organizational and Community Needs

Written by: April Carthorn, General Specialist, National Safe Place Network

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After forty-years offering support to member organizations who serve youth and families, National Safe Place Network (NSPN) has learned that needs vary by organization, in communities, and over time.  We offer a flexible structure designed to help members affordably access the benefits they need.  Base membership is $200.  We have three additional benefit packages which can be combined in an All-in-One for a $200 discount, essentially waiving the base membership fee.

Package options are:

  • Professional Development
  • Training Center
  • Organizational Development

Pricing for each package depends on the size of your agency budget at one of three levels:

  • Under $500,000
  • $500,000 to $2 million
  • Over $2 million

As we approach the start of a new membership year July 1st, we want to share with those of you who may not know how you could benefit from making NSPN your network.

Base Membership
The NSPN Base Membership is an easily affordable investment for organizations who want updated information, helpful resources and access to a national network of dedicated professionals.  Base members receive discounts on registration for NSPN events like the bi-annual Focus Conference.  Networking opportunities include access to quarterly executive leadership calls and eligibility for national awards.

Base members also have opportunities to share your expertise with peers in the field by participating in Innovation Circles research projects or contributing as a guest blogger on NSPNsights. Tell us about promising practices in your organization, community, or state or something else that you’re passionate about.  We never know how sharing our stories impacts and motivates others.

Learn more about base member benefits here: https://www.nspnetwork.org/base-membership

Professional Development
The Professional Development benefits package is designed for agencies dedicated to educating, motivating, and cultivating their staff.  Succession planning starts with identifying potential leaders and developing their skills to grow people in your organization.  The Emerging Leaders Institute (ELI) is one grand example.  Participants examine their past, present, and aspiring leadership journey with other NSPN members.

As a former middle manager, I often struggled most with meeting the needs of both upper management and program staff.  Playing the middle man/woman between two vital entities that each have a different focus, skill set, understanding and responsibility can be draining and at times overwhelming.  Professional coaching for middle managers is invaluable support for learning to create the right balance.

Learn more about Professional Development benefits here: https://www.nspnetwork.org/professional-development-package

Training Center
The NSPN Training Center benefits package is targeted toward organizations seeking access to tools, trainings and other resources that help staff best serve youth, young adults and their families.  Along with access to the Destination for Online Training (DOT), Training Center members receive specialized services.  NSPN staff or Subject Matter Experts will work with members to customize webinars or other training to meet their needs.

Training Center members also received discounts on our most popular site-based learning opportunities, including CYC and Youth Thrive.  Learn more about Child and Youth Care: Foundations Course and becoming a certified youth care worker here: https://www.nspnetwork.org/child-youth-care-certification.  More information about the Youth Thrive Curriculum is available here: https://www.nspnetwork.org/youth-thrive-curriculum.

Learn about other Training Center benefits here: https://www.nspnetwork.org/training-center-package

Organizational Development
This benefits package is targeted toward organizations who seek to strengthen or maintain a solid and sustainable organizational structure.  Disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and to anyone.  Being prepared to respond quickly and appropriately is key to how individuals, organizations and communities recover in times of crisis or adversity.  Some member organizations have suffered losses or dealt with traumatic incidents.  NSPN provides crisis debriefing for staff and volunteers of member agencies with the Organizational Development package.

NSPN can also assist Organizational Development members by reviewing human resources policies and procedures and providing feedback.  It’s a good practice to revisit policies and procedures periodically. Amendments may be necessary as changes in mission, organizational structure or populations served occur over time.

Learn more about Organizational Development benefits here: https://www.nspnetwork.org/organizational-development-package

All-in-One Membership
The value of NSPN base membership and add-on packages increase the more members take advantage of their benefits.  And your best investment is the All-in-One package, with access to benefits to improve your programs and services, invest in your staff and leaders, and develop organizational capacity.  As a bonus, NSPN members receive a $200 discount when they upgrade to the All-in-One package.

I am happy to answer any questions you may have and show you how much we value our members. You can reach me, April Carthorn, at support@nspnetwork.org.

NSPN and the Academy for Competent Youth Work Team Up to Help Advance the Youth Services Field

In honor of 2015 International Child and Youth Care Workers’ Week last week (May 3-9), NSPN is pleased to announce a partnership with the Academy for Competent Youth Work to provide Child and Youth Care certification training. The Academy for Competent Youth Work is effectively transforming the practice of child and youth care by focusing on these core goals: 1) Prepare a competent international youth care workforce; 2) Help youth care organizations develop and implement research-based best practices; 3) Advocate for quality services for children, youth and families; and 4) Advocate on behalf of Child and Youth Care Practitioners. NSPN is proud to be the exclusive national partner with the Academy for Competent Youth Work for complete access to training. This partnership provides the opportunity for NSPN to offer this certification training: “Child and Youth Care Foundations Course” and certification exam. Participants may pursue certification at the Basic and Associate levels (national certification) or the Professional level (international certification).

There are many benefits to becoming a certified youth care worker:

  • Receive the benefits of high-quality, cost-effective training that builds on individual experiences of child and youth workers.
  • Become part of a competent, certified group of child and youth care workers advancing the youth services field.
  • Individuals with varying levels of experience are welcome.
  • Discounted course registration fees available for NSPN members and licensed Safe Place agencies. Course registration is free for FYSB-funded RHY grantee agencies.

The CYC: Foundations Course is eight 5-hour modules that include the following topics:

  • Introduction to Professional CYC Practice
  • Professional Ethics and Regulation
  • Brain-based Guidance Techniques
  • Assessment and Documentation
  • Communication
  • Developmentally Based Programming
  • Relationship Development
  • Group Work
  • Activity Development and Leadership
  • Supervising Children and Youth
  • Cultural Diversity

Contact us for additional information about how you can become a Certified Youth Care Worker – info@nspnetwork.org or 502.635.3660.

Breaking Down Barriers: Working with Children, Youth, and Families Impacted by “Disabilities”

By: Dee Blose, Executive Director, Youth & Family Services, Inc.

We all have a “disability” of sorts.  I wear glasses.  Without them I would be lost in this world.  Glasses are basically my accommodation to help me better access my environment.  They help me be the best that I can be!

That is the purpose of any accommodation for someone that learns, processes, or accesses the world in a different way.  If we could think of “disabilities” as mere differences, rather than a weakness, then we have made the first step to break down a barrier for our clients.

I have had the amazing opportunity to get to know a group of children, youth and young adults with a variety of “abilities” through some of our programing here at Youth & Family Services, Inc. in El Reno, Oklahoma.  We have a partnership with AutismOklahoma.org, a state-wide parent driven autism support system.  Through that partnership we assist with a couple of summer camps, and a year round social/entrepreneurial club called Bee’s Knees.

What we have found through working with a variety of children, youth and young adults on the autism spectrum is that they are more like the rest of us than different!  And that is where our common ground lies.  Finding those “touch points” where our interests can intersect give us the perfect space to come together and share, communicate, and grow together.  Music, animals, art, and hobbies all offer this common ground that we can join together celebrating.

One of the most rewarding experiences I have had with Bee’s Knees was attendance at an art show showcasing their artwork.  Youth that are quiet, non-social, suddenly open up about their art, especially when their art is about an interest of theirs.  Art about computers, video games, electronics, movies, books, animals, whatever is their passion all the sudden leads to communication and socializing.  It is a glorious sight to see them engage.  One particular young man will take a strangers arm and gently lead them over to his work.  Although he has a stutter, he is adamant that he describes his work in detail.  It always seems to actually have a complete story, a beginning and an end.  One of his works describes the process of renting a video game, everything from ordering it on-line to the postman delivering it to his mailbox, to him enjoying it (artwork included below).

gamefly

Without common ground opportunities, this type of communication would be lost, never even heard in the context of a public event or public opportunity.  It would rather be a topic of a social skills conversation where a therapist would be challenging this youth to NOT talk about his video game, but to try and stay to more “socially appropriate” topics.  I don’t know about you but one of my favorite things to talk about are my current interests, so why would they be any different?

Developing programs that capitalize on their interest and their strengths opens up the world to new possibilities.  Suddenly these barriers become moments of enlightenment and new human interactions, new appreciations for different points of wonder, new experiences from both directions.

Consider as you are identifying “barriers” to participation for children, youth, and families impacted by “disabilities” that you look at it in an entirely different way.  If you were on their side of the “barrier” what would be important to you?  Where would you want to interface and engage?  What have you got to showcase to the world?  Then build a program or event or activity from that perspective, inviting all the rest of the world (or group) to join.  It may very well be that the barrier we have erected is basically only perceived from the original perspective.  You may very well now not see a barrier, but rather a bridge that connects us all together into one glorious group of humans that can laugh, sing, dance, and participate as complimenting spirits in the program we call “life”.

For more information about Youth & Family Services in El Reno, Oklahoma, visit their website: http://www.yfsok.org/

For more information about Bee’s Knees visit their website: http://beeskneesart.com/ 

To see a full length movie (one hour) about Swanky Art Camp, including meeting many campers on the autism spectrum, view it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MMDSzqtwww 

To get more general disability accommodation information, visit this websitehttp://www.aucd.org/itac/template/index.cfm

Spring Forward with National Safe Place Network

By: Katie Carter, Director of Research, Education & Public Policy, NSPN

I love spring. It’s a time of new beginnings, warmer weather, flowers…

We mark this time of year at NSPN by launching our annual membership and licensed agency renewal drive. In case you missed the launch, you can read more here: http://www.nspnetwork.org/join-the-network.

I’d love to take this opportunity to share some of the exciting things we are doing, and some of the things we have planned. For starters, many of you are wrapping up the busy grant-writing season. We’ve been providing support to many of our member agencies, answering questions and reviewing proposals. We are available to do this year-round, for any of your grant proposals, not just your federal proposals. We wish you all luck who are writing and submitting proposals in the next few days.

Later in April, we are hosing a webinar for NSPN members about host homes. Some of you have been asking what host homes are. In the host home model, youth live temporarily with members of the community while receiving services. Host homes can serve as emergency shelters or as longer-term housing for youth in transitional living programs. Depending on the individual state regulation, the placement may be licensed of unlicensed. Agencies in rural areas often consider host homes a practical alternative to both short-term shelters (Basic Centers) and longer-term transitional housing (Transitional Living Programs). The host home model is a flexible model providing housing and stability. We have a terrific, experienced panel lined up to share experiences using host homes in their states. We have representatives joining us from Catholic Charities Diocese of Charlotte, Project Oz, and Vermont Coalition of Runaway and Homeless Youth Programs. If you are curious about learning more about the model, or want to figure out how to strengthen the model in your state, check out this webinar on April 29 at 2 p.m. NSPN members can register here:  https://nspn.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_mc&view=mc&mcid=form_191383.

Later this spring, we are also convening an on-line course, Clinicians’ Coffee House. This four-week course will cover: how self-care can lead to preventing vicarious trauma and contribute to a better trauma-informed approach for your entire organization. You can learn more and sign-up here: https://nspn.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_mc&view=mc&mcid=form_192441.

Be on the lookout for additional webinars and training opportunities through National Safe Place Network membership. We are excited about the events we have coming up and look forward to sharing them with you.

Don’t be Fooled, NSPN has you Covered

By Katie Carter and TC Cassidy

Whether your RHY-funded staff members are attending RHYTTAC conferences and trainings, you are a Safe Place agency getting help locating and recruiting sites, or you are a NSPN member during this hectic grant season, your team at NSPN is here to help – really! This is not a joke.

RHYTTAC Support

FYSB RHYTTAC-Logo

RHYTTAC is funded by the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) as the training and technical assistance provider for all FYSB-funded RHY grantees. RHYTTAC staff members all have a background in FYSB-funded RHY program services and understand the challenges programs face in striving to achieve the best possible outcomes in the midst of staff turnover, community change and ever-emerging needs of the RHY population.

RHYTTAC provides tools, resources and consultation to assist FYSB RHY grantees so that they may engage in continuous quality improvement of their services and build their capacity to effectively serve RHY. Technical assistance services can include the provision of relevant resources; telephone consultation; email exchanges; Community of Practice support; on-site assessment and consultation to address program-specific needs. Technical assistance may be requested directly by a grantee or a Federal Project Officer may request RHYTTAC’s involvement to support a grantee’s effort.

RHYTTAC services are free for grantee organizations, with the exception of a small registration fee for the National RHY Grantees Conference and travel-related expenses. Recognizing that travel costs are often prohibitive for many grantees, RHYTTAC is working to ensure that topics delivered via technical assistance clinics and trainings are also made available to all grantees via the website and other outlets.

RHYTTAC wants to hear from you. If there is a training topic you would like to see added to the calendar for upcoming webinars or on-site events, please let us know by contacting us at info@rhyttac.net.

National Safe Place Network (NSPN) Member Support

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In addition to operating RHYTTAC, for more than three decades, NSPN has provided services and support for agencies serving youth and families. NSPN offers a unique set of packages designed to meet the needs of youth and family service agencies across the country.

NSPN members are a part of a national network of dedicated youth service professionals working to strengthen the lives of youth and families. We provide training opportunities to gain Continuing Education Units, share current trends, best practices, and keep members updated on news and research.

We are here for you, to answer your questions, guide you through grant proposal applications, and introduce you to others in the field, doing similar work. If interested in learning more about membership opportunities, check out: www.nspnetwork.org/join-the-network.

Safe Place Program Support

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NSPN is constantly seeking to provide the greatest return on the investment that local licensed agencies make in implementing Safe Place in their communities. We offer materials and resources, professional program support, training and industry networking opportunities. Don’t Safe Place in your community? Let us know and we will work with you to see if starting the program is a feasible option. For more information about Safe Place, please visit: www.nationalsafeplace.org.

Don’t be fooled by all NSPN has to offer. We are here to help. Just let us know what you need!

Women’s History Month Recognition: Celebrating Strength, Courage and Positive Self-Esteem

On Thursday, March 12, 2015, the NSPN Communications Team (Elizabeth Smith Miller and Hillary Ladig) hosted RHYTTAC’s weekly-scheduled Talk it Out Thursday call. This week’s topic was, “Women’s History Month Recognition: Celebrating Strength, Courage and Positive Self-Esteem.” Many girls (and boys, for that matter) will enter your program having survived events that can tear anyone’s esteem down. It’s important to recognize low self-esteem and identify what factors that may be causing it. There are many types of issues and many reasons that cause them. There are also many ways to help boost esteem, build courage, and encourage strength.

We have compiled a list of resources related to this topic that we hope you find to be helpful.

Learning About and Teaching Women’s History

TeachingHistory.org’s Women’s History Resources: This is a one-stop shop for diving deep into Women’s History Month. Here, educators will find learning resources, lesson plans, and a long list of quizzes and printables for the classroom. http://teachinghistory.org/spotlight/womens-history

EDSITEment Women’s History Resources: Produced by the National Endowment for the Humanities, these resources include featured lesson plans and teaching resources that cover women in politics, the arts, and military and civilian service. The comprehensive plans highlight time required and subjects covered, and they include worksheets and links to required reading and resources. http://edsitement.neh.gov/feature/womens-history-month

Women’s History Resources for Teachers: These resources from the Library of Congress encourage teachers and students “to put primary resources to work in the classroom.” Featuring packaged lesson plans, this is a great resource. There are also wonderful audio and video resources, thorough primary source collections, and a number of timeless photo projects.http://womenshistorymonth.gov/teachers.html

Women’s History Month: You may also want to check out the Library’s official Women’s History Month page at: http://womenshistorymonth.gov/.

Science NetLinks Women’s History Collection: This Science NetLinks collection complements this year’s WHM theme well, which looks at women in STEM fields. This page features science lesson plans and teaching resources for all students of all ages. Teachers can filter results by grade level, and there is also a great list of science-specific outside links to lesson plans. http://sciencenetlinks.com/collections/womens-history-month/

ReadWriteThink’s Women’s History: Here, educators will find thoughtful lesson plans, a list of links to online women’s history resources, as well as after-school ideas for teaching women’s history for parents. There are teacher-written lesson plans available for grades 3-12. http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/calendar-activities/march-national-women-history-20452.html

Zinn Education Project’s Women’s History Resources: These lesson plans incorporate Howard Zinn’s “A People’s History of the United States,” and they encourage classrooms to delve into American history by looking at our collective past through the eyes of everyday people. Instead of just highlighting iconic historical figures, these lessons look at history through the eyes of common women. (Note: access requires free registration.) http://zinnedproject.org/teaching-materials/%20-%20themes-womens-history

Reading Lists and Additional Collections for Students about Women’s History

There are so many great women’s history reads and resources online, and it’s hard to select just a few for youth. But, hopefully, these reading lists and additional resource collections will help spark curiosity in your programs.

A Collection of Teaching Resources for WHM, Scholastic Teachers: http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/collection/womens-history-month-collection-teaching-resources

The Origins of Women’s History Month, HISTORY: http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/womens-history-month

The Best History Websites for WHM, EdTechTeacher: http://www.besthistorysites.net/index.php/american-history/women

WHM Videos, Articles, and Multimedia, Biography.com: http://www.biography.com/search/Women’s%20History

Women’s History Month Reading Resources, TIME for Kids: http://www.timeforkids.com/minisite/womens-history-month

Women’s History Month Reading List, Reading Rockets: http://www.timeforkids.com/minisite/womens-history-month

Celebrate Women’s History, The New York Times’ The Learning Network: http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/teaching-topics/celebrate-womens-history-month/?_r=0

Women’s History and Children’s Books, Carol Hurst’s Children’s Literature Site: http://www.carolhurst.com/subjects/history/women.html

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/collection/womens-history-month-collection-teaching-resources

http://womenshistorymonth.gov/teachers.html

Want to Learn More About Self-Esteem?

What is Self-Esteem? http://psychology.about.com/od/sindex/f/what-is-self-esteem.htm

Low Self-Esteem: This article shares information on the curvilinear model of self-esteem, empirical research, and low self-esteem in children and teens. http://www.simplypsychology.org/self-esteem.html

Low Self-esteem Signs and Symptoms: http://www.self-help-and-self-development.com/low-self-esteem-signs.html

5 Possible Causes of Low Self-esteem: http://www.self-help-and-self-development.com/causes-of-low-self-esteem.html

10 Sources of Low Self-esteem: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/me-we/201312/10-sources-low-self-esteem

The Story of Self Esteem: This article provides helpful ways to explain what self-esteem is to younger children. http://kidshealth.org/kid/feeling/emotion/self_esteem.html

Teenage Girls’ Self Esteem – Your Inner Sparkle: BeingGirl.com is a helpful site dedicated to teenage girls.  Girls can visit this site to obtain information on confidence, Self esteem, Sex & Intimacy, Stress, Depression, Anxiety, Substance Abuse, Eating Disorders, Cyber Safety, and social life/work/school. http://www.beinggirl.com/article/teenage-girls-self-esteem/

TeenBreaks.com is a neat site that offers information to teens about self-esteem and other topics. http://www.teenbreaks.com/confidence/selfesteem.cfm

Want to Learn More About How to Boost Self-Esteem?

Girls with Low Self-esteem: How to Raise Girls with Healthy Self-Esteem: This article shares information such as “when and why” self-esteem drops, the sexualization of girls and mental health problems, and more. http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Mirror_Mirror_Wall/

Help Children Develop a Positive Self-esteem: http://childdevelopmentinfo.com/child-psychology/self-esteem/

Helping Teens Develop a Healthy Body Image: http://www.webmd.com/parenting/raising-fit-kids/mood/healthy-body-image

Livestrong.com offers a site with self-esteem resources including “activities to promote self-esteem in girls”. http://www.livestrong.com/article/131858-activities-promote-self-esteem-girls/

Youth Communication Program (click “For Agencies” & “For Teens” tabs): http://youthcomm.org/who_we_are/publish.html

Self-Esteem Boosting Worksheets

Therapistaid.com offers many great tools for boosting self-esteem. http://www.therapistaid.com/therapy-worksheets/selfesteem/adolescents

http://activitiesforchildrenandteens.blogspot.com/2012/02/self-esteem-boosting-worksheets.html

View-Worthy Videos

Always #LikeAGirl: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjJQBjWYDTs

A Dove Film: A girl’s self esteem: https://youtu.be/4ytjTNX9cg0

We invite you to join us every Thursday at 1pm ET. No need to sign up!  Just call us at 1-605-475-5950 and enter passcode 4560151# when prompted. Be sure to check your weekly TIOT email for the topic. Check out rhyttac.net to learn more about Talk It Out Thursday. Feel free to connect with us at info@rhyttac.net to share your ideas or learn more about NSPN, Safe Place, RHYTTAC, and HTR3!

Knowing the Difference Between RHYTTAC and National Safe Place Network

National Safe Place Network (NSPN) operates the FYSB-funded Runaway and Homeless Youth Training and Technical Assistance Center (RHYTTAC). NSPN also offers a unique set of packages designed to meet your needs in ways that make sense for your organization and community that differs from the technical assistance and training provided by RHYTTAC. Do you know how to tell the difference between NSPN and RHYTTAC services?

NSPN-and-RHYTTAC-Differences

To view a printable version of this document, please click here: https://nspn.memberclicks.net/assets/docs/NSPN/nspn%20rhy%20difference%20flyer%20-%20in%20house%20print.pdf

Reflecting back on the 2014 National RHY Grantees Conference

Often times we have a moment that we find ourselves reflecting upon the furthest and most recent moments of our lives.  These moments can make us smile, laugh, cry… but most of all, they can remind us of our gratitude towards someone. Each year, we (the NSPN/RHYTTAC staff) have such a blast planning and hosting the National RHY Grantees conference for you.  As the time grows closer, we become very eager to see the hard work come to fruition.  The thing we are most excited for however, is seeing and connecting with each of you.  We see you arrive to the conference, excited to be in a new place, excited to see old friends and meet new colleagues, and exited to learn!  During the first day we see it… the SPARK. It’s a contagious spark that spreads like wildfire through each and every one of you. This SPARK is INSPIRATION.  During the end of the conference, yes, you are tired from all the great activities and intriguing training workshops, but during the end of the conference you can’t help but to see, hear, and FEEL the inspiration that flows through you.  What you take back to your fellow staff, organization, and community is something that can change lives. Yes, our friends – what we look forward to the most is you and your inspiration to make a difference in the RHY world!  Thank you for allowing us to be a part of the difference you make in so many lives.  

If you missed the conference or would like a reminder of how much fun we had… here are a few videos created during the conference, including our Video Blog from the night of the RHYA Anniversary Celebration! 

Opening Session:
Native American Welcome Ceremony – Phoenix Oyate Singers http://youtu.be/1t6LIrywMRg  
Native American Welcome Ceremony – Dance:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShH8cLcnX1g 

40th RHYA Anniversary Celebration:
Video Blog:  http://youtu.be/P2UdILm2Ncs
Thank You Video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPwuhT-gYU4

Want to see more from the conference?  Check out our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/rhyttac where we posted live!  Posts include photos, videos, and quotes from the keynote sessions.  In the mean time, we’re getting preparing for the 2015 National RHY Grantees Conference where we hope to see you inspired even more!

Conference Logo

Tips for Becoming an Authentic Speaker

Authenticity has become a bit of a buzz word in recent years. From “authentic leadership” to “authentic communication,” you may have noticed the word being used more and more. We have created a tip sheet that describes authenticity, outlines why it’s important in training and presenting, and provides some tips for achieving authentic communication. Here’s a tip from the document:

  • Speak confidently. Avoid getting softer at the end of sentences. Try to start and end strongly. Also avoid raising your pitch at the end of sentences, turning it into a question.

National Safe Place Network members with Training Center access can read the entire document, “Tips for Becoming an Authentic Speaker,” by logging into your membership account at www.nspnetwork.org and accessing the NSPN resource center.

To learn more about becoming a Network member and available services, visit the website listed above or contact Katie Carter at kcarter@nspnetwork.org or 502.635.3660.